The Truths About Religion: Open Secrets Part 4

There are people among us who have the ability to set Neshamah [ego] aside and perceive the world from the perspectives of Chayyah and Yechidah [Spirit]. These are the prophets and sages that have arisen in every age among every people. Since most of us cannot attain these prophetic heights we create a system to preserve the teachings of those who do. Religion is that system.

In the book Open Secrets, Rami Shapiro makes the above statement (emphasis mine). The book is written as spiritual fiction. It is a collection of letters written by Rami Shapiro’s great-grandfather’s Rabbi and mentor, Yerachmiel ben Yisrael. The letters seek to answer a series of questions posed by Rami Shapiro’s great-grandfather. The above passage is in response to his question about the purpose of religion.

I happen to be of the same opinion as Reb Yerachmiel on this issue. I believe that religion is a framework, and that we have mistakenly confused the vessel (religion) with the wine (spirituality). And like the Rabbi, I believe that religion is of the utmost importance in one’s life. It is your chosen path to explore your understanding of God and your relationship to Spirit.

Understanding that any particular religion is A path to God and not THE path to God is key to understanding the Truths of your religion. In the book, the Rabbi draws a comparison between the telephone game and religious texts.

In the telephone game, children whisper in the air of the person next to them a message that was passed to them. When the message gets all the way around, the last person tells the group the message he heard and the first person tells the message he originally sent. When I played the game as a child, the people at the beginning of the ring would look with bewilderment as the last person said the message and the people on the other end were in equal bewilderment over the original message.

After thousands of years of oral tradition, followed by several translations and interpretations, I think it’s safe to say that our religious texts contain Truth, but are not fact.

That said, I still believe that religion provides an effective framework to explore those Truths. In all religions there is the concept of One God. (I thought different of tribal traditions, but learned otherwise.) Every religion expouses the virtue and practice of love. This shows up as compassion, forgiveness, and unconditional love, depending on the religion. Every religion talks about the idea that people are children of God. And every religion thinks that growing closer to God helps and growing away from God hurts. The stories, the customs, the moral codes, and the concept of God, make the religions different.

In Spirit,
Nneka

Nneka Kelly, Woo Biz Coach
Nneka works with budding holistic practitioners and Woo Biz Owners to honor your intuition while creating systems to grow your business.

Trackbacks & Pings

  • How To Find The Truths In Religion - Spirituality Applied to Life - Balanced Life Center :

    […] So last week, I wrote a post about the Truths in religion, and my friend Leo of Zen Habits asked me, “What’s in it for me?” “How does this help me in my life? Yeah, it’s inspirational, but how do I find the Truth in religion?” Then I went to the Open Secrets book study last night, and one of the guys said that religions don’t tell you how to find God, they just pound into your head their version of what God is. […]

    11 years ago
  • Divorce -Turn To Religion To Get Through It All | Self Help Station :

    […] A divorce is seen as a sin most religions. It’s hard to fall back on religion went they persecute you, however, there are ways that you can use your faith to help you through something as difficult as a divorce. Faith is what grounds us. Faith is what says what’s wrong and what’s right. When your heart is broken, you can use your faith to give you strength to help you connect back to yourself. If you are going through a divorce right now, you may find your faith gone, but it is not. You are hurt, you are trying to cope with it the best you can. […]

    10 years ago